PSPs, Payment Facilitators, and Aggregators

on Jun3

Depending on particular region of the world, the terms payment service provider (PSP), payment facilitator, and payment aggregator can denote different concepts and have slightly different meanings, i.e. one and the same type of entity can be called in a different way. However, globally, the three different concepts do exist, no matter how you might call them.

The purpose of this article is to explain the difference between the three crucial concepts, defining the three types of important merchant services industry players. Let us now provide a more detailed explanation of the differences.

Payment Service Providers

A payment service provider (PSP) is an organization, which provides individual merchant accounts to its merchants (i.e. provides traditional merchant services). Such a company works with a group of merchants, however it, generally, does not participate in the process of merchant funding.

A PSP facilitates merchant underwriting and payment processing, but merchant funding is, generally, done directly by the acquirer. Subsequently, a payment service provider can derive certain residual revenue only from the processing fees collected by the acquirer.

Payment Facilitators and Aggregators

A payment facilitator is similar to a PSP, but in contrast to a PSP, a payment facilitator does fund the merchants directly. However, the entities which conduct sub-merchant funding can be further subdivided into two groups.

The first group includes classical payment facilitators. In this case each business (merchant) is treated as a sub-merchant of the payment facilitator. This means that there is a separate MID, that is issued for each merchant involved in processing.

The second group includes the so-called aggregators. In case of an aggregator the same MID is used for every sub-merchant.

Examples

An example of a payment service provider is any independent sales organization (ISO). ISOs and resellers of merchant services can serve as examples of merchant service providers. Almost every bank nowadays has a department dealing with merchant services.A restaurant software (gym software, club management software, or any POS software) company is an example of a classical payment facilitator. Each restaurant using the software can get the merchant account through the POS development company. In this case the payment facilitator (being the software and financial services company) is going to review the account, collect the proper information from the customer and register it as a sub-merchant in their payment facilitator’s portfolio.

Another example includes such companies as lodging services (for instance, Airbnb) or marketplaces. A person renting accommodation through Airbnb does not have his own MID. A general aggregate MID is used for the whole service. The aggregator funds the apartment owners, and ensures that appropriate payments are deposited to respective apartment owners’ accounts.

One of the principal differences between payment facilitators and aggregators is the size of businesses (merchants) the two types of entities are dealing with. Payment facilitator model is suitable and effective in cases when the sub-merchant in question is a medium- or large-size business. Classical payment aggregator model is more suitable when the merchant in question is either an individual or a small business. Consequently, sub-merchants of classical aggregators must follow certain constraints of maximal processing volumes. When transaction volumes of a merchant become larger, this merchant can be obliged to have its own MID, or even become an independent business.

Conclusion

As the need for payment service providers and payment facilitators grows, you may consider becoming one. It is important to identify the specific model that you want to follow and ensure that you have necessary banking relationships, procedures, and software to handle the needs of the respective market segment.

Visit the UniPayGateway website if you are interested in the diagram illustrating this topic.

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